20090402-spoon.jpgThere's something about anthropormorphized utensils that you just have to love. In honor of International Children's Book Day today, here is a look at Spoon by Amy Krouse Rosenthal and illustrated by Scott Magoon.

The protagonist is a spoon with your average identity issues—should he be jealous of forks that can twist up pasta? Are exotic chopsticks a threat? Does he live a fulfilled life if he can't spread jam?

For the most part, Spoon lives a pretty happy existence scooping up stuff, with a sliver of a line as a mouth (usually smiling) and stick figure hands (that wave). But you know, it's tough. Images from the book, after the jump.

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This is probably my favorite page. The spoon family tree, with a moustached uncle on the left and slotted spoon cousins. Gotta love the freakishly tall ladle.

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But those rounded edges mean he'll never see the likes of a salad or spongy cake. He'll never be a fork. Sigh.

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But like all feel-good children's books, Spoon realizes he has strengths, even if they are limited to cereal bowls and tea-stirring. And not to ruin the ending, but there's a bedroom scene that uses one of his best strengths—a horizontal snuggle move. None of the other utensils can claim that.

If there were to be a sequel, I feel like sporks are up next. They've got plenty of messed-up identity issues.

'Spoon' will go on sale on April 7.

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