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Cheese 101: The Incredible Cheese From America's Heartland

As the producer of 25% of America's cheese (three billion pounds!), Wisconsin certainly earns its title of America's Dairyland. Most of this output is mass-produced cheese destined for supermarkets. But Wisconsin's—and the rest of the Midwest's—undercurrent of craft cheesemaking is well worth paying attention to. Here is where 4,000 years of European tradition meets American gumption, and the result is some incredible cheese. More

Make-Ahead Thanksgiving Dishes That Travel Well

Hosting Thanksgiving is a daunting task. Also daunting: bringing a dish with you to a dinner hosted by someone else. It needs to be something that can withstand travel and requires minimal work once you arrive—because the kitchen is going to be chock full of insanity. Here are a whole bunch of great ideas. More

Beyond Turkey: The Migration of Thanksgiving Tradition

Thanksgiving is, if anything, an immigrant's holiday; a story of the bridging of new world and old. So it's fitting that, like people, Thanksgiving traditions themselves continue to migrate and evolve. We spoke to first- and second-generation immigrants in the food industry about how the cuisines of their ancestral homes have influenced the Thanksgiving meals they make here in the US. Here's what they had to say. More

Weekend Recap: This Week on Serious Eats

We went all out preparing for Thanksgiving this week. We deep fried turkeys and made cheddar ice cream to top your apple pies. Plus, an overview of how to brine your chicken or turkey and a 100% vegan Thanksgiving menu. Check out everything you missed this week on Serious Eats! More

This Week in Recipes

A fast food Thanksgiving feast, extra-crispy herb roasted potatoes, and Vegetables Wellington, a totally plant based entree that even carnivores will devour. See everything we made this week on Serious Eats! More

Take Your Spatchcocked Turkey to the Grill for Extra-Moist, Evenly Cooked Meat

The grill is well-suited to roasted turkey perfection. Situating the darker meat closer to a two-zone indirect fire lets the legs and thighs cook faster than the more delicate breast meat, leaving both sections of the bird to reach their respective ideal temperatures at the same time. Plus there's the bonus of adding wood chunks for lightly smoky, more flavorful meat. More

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